gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
...knows that I have a 'thing' for all things NASA.jpg
And not just because my father worked there throughout my formative years. I just like NASA .

For instance, they find interesting and fun ways to involve the public in their adventures in space exploration.
               Case in point, waaaaay back in 1995 or so, I came across, and no, I don't remember how, signature postcards addressed to the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) located almost locally, mid-way between here and LA, at the California Institute of Technology, that if they were returned in a timely manner would become part of a golden disc of collected signatures that would be included onboard the Cassini spacecraft on its journey to Saturn.

This golden disc, along with its over 205,000.engraved signatures, would eventually meet its demise by plunging into the planet itself. In some far off and distant future, I could barely imagined, the signatures of my mom, who actually died just before Cassini launched in 1997, my dad, who died ten years later, and me and my then husband of 10 years, 30 now, would all burn up in Saturn's atmosphere thereby, in my mind, allowing us to become a part of the very composition of Saturn itself.

After its highly successful 20 year journey, Cassini is now orbiting between Saturn's inner-most ring and the planet’s surface and will tomorrow, Friday September 15, 2017, meet its demise with a slow and controlled descent into Saturn's atmosphere. For me, this is bittersweet because I have been able to imagine all this time, my parents signatures traveling through space. Mine and David's too, and tomorrow that ends.

Still, tomorrow we become, in a way, a part of Saturn and that is pretty, pretty cool too. So, thank you NASA for allowing us to journey along with you in such a personal way. I am in your gratitude .And Cassini, you will be missed.



If you want more info, follow the link to The Grand Finale Tool Kit and do a bit of exploring yourself.

***
 

gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
I think, as these periodically come along, I'll post them here because they really are speedy yet full of information about ISS!
NASA.jpg From: YouTube NASA Johnson_The International Space Station is a one-of-a-kind spot for scientists who want to do experiments where there’s no gravity, to find out how other natural forces function without gravity’s influence. In this “SpeedyTime” segment, Expedition 52 flight engineer Jack Fischer uses a few simple tools to demonstrate what happens to water in space when there’s no pull of gravity.



***

SaveSaveSave
gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
I think, as these periodically come along, I'll post them here because they really are speedy yet full of information about ISS!
NASA.jpg From: YouTube NASA Johnson_Doing groundbreaking science can mean working with dangerous materials; how do the astronauts on the International Space Station protect themselves and their ship in those cases? They use the Microgravity Science Glovebox: in this “SpeedyTime” segment Expedition 52 flight engineer Peggy Whitson pulls a rack out of the wall of the Destiny Laboratory to show us how astronauts access a sealed environment for science and technology experiments that involve potentially hazardous
materials.



***
SaveSave
gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
I think, as these periodically come along, I'll post them here because they really are speedy yet full of information about ISS!
NASA.jpg From: YouTube NASA Johnson_When you live in a place where your heart doesn’t even have to work against the pull of gravity, you need help with exercise: the astronauts on the International Space Station have a suite of exercise equipment at their disposal, including a treadmill. In this “SpeedyTime” segment Expedition 52 flight engineer Jack Fischer runs through the workout they get on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (COLBERT) in the station’s Tranquility module.



***
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
I think, as these periodically come along, I'll post them here because they really are speedy yet full of information about ISS!

SpeedyTime #1, about  Kibo Airlock, can be found here.

From
: YouTube NASA Johnson_Astronauts on the International Space Station have to exercise for two hours every day, but they can show off the hardware in a lot less time than that. In this “SpeedyTime” segment Expedition 52 flight engineer Peggy Whitson gives us a rapid-fire display of exercises that can be done with just one piece of equipment, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device in the Tranquility module.


***

gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
...I'll post them here because they really are speedy yet full of information about ISS!

     From YouTube: NASA Johnson
No one knows the International Space Station better than the people who live and work there—and now they’re sharing that knowledge in bite-sized chunks. In the first of a series of short videos called “SpeedyTime,” Expedition 52 flight engineer Jack Fischer gives us a quick-but-thorough tour of payload activities inside and outside the airlock in the station’s Japanese laboratory module, Kibo.



***

Save
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
Image Credit & Copyright: Marco Burali, Tiziano Capecchi, Marco Mancini (MTM observatory, Italy)

Explanation: In the vast Orion Molecular Cloud complex, several bright blue nebulas are particularly apparent. Pictured here are two of the most prominent reflection nebulas - dust clouds lit by the reflecting light of bright embedded stars. The more famous nebula is M78, in the image center, cataloged over 200 years ago. To its left is the lesser known NGC 2071. Astronomers continue to study these reflection nebulas to better understand how interior stars form. The Orion complex lies about 1500 light-years distant, contains the Orion and Horsehead nebulas, and covers much of the constellation of Orion.

***

gaeln9796: (icon holiday_month_february_valentine's_)
All pretty in pink!!
HeartCloud_Kunze_960.jpg
A heart cloud that needs no description
AND The Cat's Eye Nebula from Hubble which really doesn't but I will describe anyway :)
From: NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Reprocessing & Copyright: Raul Villaverde

Explanation: To some, it may look like a cat's eye. The alluring Cat's Eye nebula, however, lies three thousand light-years from Earth across interstellar space. A classic planetary nebula, the Cat's Eye (NGC 6543) represents a final, brief yet glorious phase in the life of a sun-like star. This nebula's dying central star may have produced the simple, outer pattern of dusty concentric shells by shrugging off outer layers in a series of regular convulsions. But the formation of the beautiful, more complex inner structures is not well understood. Seen so clearly in this digitally reprocessed Hubble Space Telescope image, the truly cosmic eye is over half a light-year across. Of course, gazing into this Cat's Eye, astronomers may well be seeing the fate of our sun, destined to enter its own planetary nebula phase of evolution ... in about 5 billion years.
***
gaeln9796: (icon holiday_month_february_valentine's_)
All pretty in pink!!
HeartCloud_Kunze_960.jpg
A heart cloud that needs no discription
AND The Cat's Eye Nebula from Hubble which really doesn't but I will describe anyway :)
From: NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day
Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Reprocessing & Copyright: Raul Villaverde

Explanation: To some, it may look like a cat's eye. The alluring Cat's Eye nebula, however, lies three thousand light-years from Earth across interstellar space. A classic planetary nebula, the Cat's Eye (NGC 6543) represents a final, brief yet glorious phase in the life of a sun-like star. This nebula's dying central star may have produced the simple, outer pattern of dusty concentric shells by shrugging off outer layers in a series of regular convulsions. But the formation of the beautiful, more complex inner structures is not well understood. Seen so clearly in this digitally reprocessed Hubble Space Telescope image, the truly cosmic eye is over half a light-year across. Of course, gazing into this Cat's Eye, astronomers may well be seeing the fate of our sun, destined to enter its own planetary nebula phase of evolution ... in about 5 billion years.
***
Save
gaeln9796: (icon words_OMG)
NASA.jpg The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble_Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA:
Reprocessing & Copyright:
Jesús M.Vargas & Maritxu Poyal
Explanation: The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth's night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star's nebula was recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star's dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius).

***
gaeln9796: (icon words_OMG)
NASA.jpg FROM: NASA Johnson
Published on Nov 23, 2015
Finalist_"Outer Space"_Sander van den Berg_Pijnacker, Zuid-Holland
Two minutes of the astonishingly beautiful! As is our galaxy wont to be :)

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society offered filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by, and using, real NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a new short film competition. Entries used at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery and video collected throughout the agency's 50-year history. The inaugural competition drew 194 entries from 22 countries and 32 states. Prizes were awarded to the top three submissions and the two films that best demonstrated the themes "Benefits of Space to Humanity" and "Future Space Exploration."
____________________

The 2016 CineSpace Videos can be found here.

More information about CineSpace can be found here

***

Us!

Feb. 2nd, 2017 03:28 pm
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
NASA.jpg
From: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory_California Institute of Technology
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

The image combines two separate exposures taken on Nov. 20, 2016, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. For presentation, the exposures were processed separately to optimize detail visible on both Earth and the moon. The moon is much darker than Earth and would barely be visible if shown at the same brightness scale as Earth.
          The combined view retains the correct positions and sizes of the two bodies relative to each other. The distance between Earth and the moon is about 30 times the diameter of Earth. Earth and the moon appear closer than they actually are in this image because the observation was planned for a time at which the moon was almost directly behind Earth, from Mars' point of view, to see the Earth-facing side of the moon.

In the image, the reddish feature near the middle of the face of Earth is Australia. When the component images were taken, Mars was about 127 million miles (205 million kilometers) from Earth.

***

gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
Image Credit: NOAA, NASA

Explanation: Launched last November 19 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the satellite now known as GOES-16 can now observes planet Earth from a geostationary orbit 22,300 miles above the equator. Its Advanced Baseline Imager captured this contrasting view of Earth and a gibbous Moon on January 15. The stark and airless Moon is not really the focus of GOES-16, though. Capable of providing a high resolution full disk image of Earth every 15 minutes in 16 spectral channels, the new generation satellite's instrumentation is geared to provide sharper, more detailed views of Earth's dynamic weather systems and enable more accurate weather forecasting. Like previous GOES weather satellites, GOES-16 will use the moon over our fair planet as a calibration target.

***

Us!

Jan. 10th, 2017 09:52 am
gaeln9796: (icon month_july_globe)
NASA.jpg
From: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory_California Institute of Technology
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

The image combines two separate exposures taken on Nov. 20, 2016, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. For presentation, the exposures were processed separately to optimize detail visible on both Earth and the moon. The moon is much darker than Earth and would barely be visible if shown at the same brightness scale as Earth.
          The combined view retains the correct positions and sizes of the two bodies relative to each other. The distance between Earth and the moon is about 30 times the diameter of Earth. Earth and the moon appear closer than they actually are in this image because the observation was planned for a time at which the moon was almost directly behind Earth, from Mars' point of view, to see the Earth-facing side of the moon.

In the image, the reddish feature near the middle of the face of Earth is Australia. When the component images were taken, Mars was about 127 million miles (205 million kilometers) from Earth.

***

gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
NASA.jpg This is 5 minutes of beautiful images from a very dedicated man.

From: YouTube
The first time you see Planet Earth from space, it’s stunning; when you’ve spent 534 days in space—more than any other American—it still is! On his most recent trip the International Space Station NASA astronaut Jeff Williams used an Ultra High Definition video camera that he pointed at the planet 250 miles below; here he shares some of those images, and talks about the beauty of the planet, the variety of things to see, and the value of sharing that perspective with everyone who can’t go to orbit in person.


***
gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
NASA.jpg This is 5 minutes of beautiful images from a very dedicated man.

From: YouTube
The first time you see Planet Earth from space, it’s stunning; when you’ve spent 534 days in space—more than any other American—it still is! On his most recent trip the International Space Station NASA astronaut Jeff Williams used an Ultra High Definition video camera that he pointed at the planet 250 miles below; here he shares some of those images, and talks about the beauty of the planet, the variety of things to see, and the value of sharing that perspective with everyone who can’t go to orbit in person.
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
Astronomy Picture of the Day
From: NASA
Sharpless 249 and the Jellyfish Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Eric Coles

Explanation: Normally faint and elusive, the Jellyfish Nebula is caught in this alluring telescopic mosaic. The scene is anchored below by bright star Eta Geminorum, at the foot of the celestial twin, while the Jellyfish Nebula is the brighter arcing ridge of emission with tentacles dangling below and left of center. In fact, the cosmic jellyfish is part of bubble-shaped supernova remnant IC 443, the expanding debris cloud from a massive star that exploded. Light from the explosion first reached planet Earth over 30,000 years ago. Like its cousin in astrophysical waters the Crab Nebula supernova remnant, the Jellyfish Nebula is known to harbor a neutron star, the remnant of the collapsed stellar core. An emission nebula cataloged as Sharpless 249 fills the field at the upper right. The Jellyfish Nebula is about 5,000 light-years away. At that distance, this narrowband composite image presented in the Hubble Palette would be about 300 light-years across.

I try to post a couple of these per month, this the first of the new year. I can only hope you are as in awe of them, are as inspired by them, as I am! Enjoy :)

***
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
Astronomy Picture of the Day
From: NASA
Sharpless 249 and the Jellyfish Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Eric Coles

Explanation: Normally faint and elusive, the Jellyfish Nebula is caught in this alluring telescopic mosaic. The scene is anchored below by bright star Eta Geminorum, at the foot of the celestial twin, while the Jellyfish Nebula is the brighter arcing ridge of emission with tentacles dangling below and left of center. In fact, the cosmic jellyfish is part of bubble-shaped supernova remnant IC 443, the expanding debris cloud from a massive star that exploded. Light from the explosion first reached planet Earth over 30,000 years ago. Like its cousin in astrophysical waters the Crab Nebula supernova remnant, the Jellyfish Nebula is known to harbor a neutron star, the remnant of the collapsed stellar core. An emission nebula cataloged as Sharpless 249 fills the field at the upper right. The Jellyfish Nebula is about 5,000 light-years away. At that distance, this narrowband composite image presented in the Hubble Palette would be about 300 light-years across.

I try to post a couple of these per month, this the first of the new year. I can only hope you are as in awe of them, are as inspired by them, as I am! Enjoy :)

***
gaeln9796: (icon science_NASA)
Image Credit & Copyright: Data - ESO/INAF/R. Colombari/E. Recurt, Processing - R. Colombari+-

Explanation: South of Antares, in the tail of the nebula-rich constellation Scorpius, lies emission nebula IC 4628. Nearby hot, massive stars, millions of years young, irradiate the nebula with invisible ultraviolet light, stripping electrons from atoms. The electrons eventually recombine with the atoms to produce the visible nebular glow, dominated by the red emission of hydrogen. At an estimated distance of 6,000 light-years, the region shown is about 250 light-years across, spanning over three full moons on the sky. The nebula is also cataloged as Gum 56 for Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum, but seafood-loving astronomers might know this cosmic cloud as the Prawn Nebula. The tantalizing color image is a new astronomical composition using data from the European Southern Observatory's wide field OmegaCAM and amateur images made under dark skies on the Canary Island of Tenerife.

Number one can be found here!
***

gaeln9796: (icon interests_vid)
NASA.jpg

From: NASA Johnson
Top 16 Earth Images of 2016



          enjoy :)

Profile

gaeln9796: (Default)
gaeln

September 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 2
3 456 789
1011 1213 141516
171819 20 212223
24252627282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags